cocainequiches:

Datura Inoxia, also known as Moon Flower. Used for centuries in some cultures as a poison and hallucinogen.

cocainequiches:

Datura Inoxia, also known as Moon Flower. Used for centuries in some cultures as a poison and hallucinogen.

g0atman:

Volcano erupting from space

g0atman:

Volcano erupting from space

(via greatgrottu)

fischotterchen:

OH MY GOSH HE ASKED FOR A HUG AND HIS BUDDY CAME RUNNING IM GONNA CRY

fischotterchen:

OH MY GOSH HE ASKED FOR A HUG AND HIS BUDDY CAME RUNNING IM GONNA CRY

(via greatgrottu)

historicaltimes:

Spectators trying to catch a glimpse of the signing of the Treaty of Versailles, 1919.

historicaltimes:

Spectators trying to catch a glimpse of the signing of the Treaty of Versailles, 1919.

fuckyeahblakeadams:

Greeks do it better.

fuckyeahblakeadams:

Greeks do it better.

(via 0800-marijuana)

zombiesenelghetto:

Happy Birthday Iggy Pop! (April 21, 1947)
photo by Esther Friedman, St Barth, 1979

zombiesenelghetto:

Happy Birthday Iggy Pop! (April 21, 1947)

(via kahuna68)

pbsthisdayinhistory:

April 21, 1989: Tiananmen Square Protests Begin
On this day in 1989, students began protesting in Tiananmen Square, the symbolic central space of Beijing, China. Several weeks later, when the government sent in the army to end the demonstrations, the citizens of Beijing poured into the streets in support of the students.The demonstrations ended in a massacre on the night of June 3-4, when the government sent the troops into the city with orders to clear Tiananmen Square. One day later, a single, unarmed young man stood his ground before a column of tanks on the Avenue of Eternal Peace. Captured on film and video by Western journalists, this extraordinary confrontation became an icon of the struggle for freedom around the world.
In 2012, FRONTLINE took a look back at how the iconic image of the “tank man” came to be, more than twenty years after the massacre at Tiananmen Square. Photo: A Chinese man stands alone to block a line of tanks heading east on Beijing’s Changan Blvd. in Tiananmen Square on June 5, 1989. (AP/Jeff Widener)

pbsthisdayinhistory:

April 21, 1989: Tiananmen Square Protests Begin

On this day in 1989, students began protesting in Tiananmen Square, the symbolic central space of Beijing, China. Several weeks later, when the government sent in the army to end the demonstrations, the citizens of Beijing poured into the streets in support of the students.

The demonstrations ended in a massacre on the night of June 3-4, when the government sent the troops into the city with orders to clear Tiananmen Square. One day later, a single, unarmed young man stood his ground before a column of tanks on the Avenue of Eternal Peace. Captured on film and video by Western journalists, this extraordinary confrontation became an icon of the struggle for freedom around the world.

In 2012, FRONTLINE took a look back at how the iconic image of the “tank man” came to be, more than twenty years after the massacre at Tiananmen Square.

Photo: A Chinese man stands alone to block a line of tanks heading east on Beijing’s Changan Blvd. in Tiananmen Square on June 5, 1989. (AP/Jeff Widener)

(via solipsistictendencies)

dance-0f-the-damned:

"Shower while there were two dead bodies in the bathtub, and he was sane. He drilled holes in the heads of living people to make them his unresisting companions, and he was sane. He ate a bicep which he fried in a skillet, tenderised and sprinkled with sauce, and he was sane. For hours he lay with corpses, hugging them, cherishing them, and he was sane. He kept eleven assorted heads and skulls, and two complete skeletons, for eventual use in a home-made temple, and he was sane."
-Brian Masters, talking about Jeffery Dahmer in his book “The Shrine of Jeffrey Dahmer”.
*Brian Masters is a British writer best known for his biographies of mass murders.

dance-0f-the-damned:

"Shower while there were two dead bodies in the bathtub, and he was sane. He drilled holes in the heads of living people to make them his unresisting companions, and he was sane. He ate a bicep which he fried in a skillet, tenderised and sprinkled with sauce, and he was sane. For hours he lay with corpses, hugging them, cherishing them, and he was sane. He kept eleven assorted heads and skulls, and two complete skeletons, for eventual use in a home-made temple, and he was sane."

-Brian Masters, talking about Jeffery Dahmer in his book “The Shrine of Jeffrey Dahmer”.

*Brian Masters is a British writer best known for his biographies of mass murders.

(via richdads)

unexplained-events:

anscathmarcach:

unexplained-events:

Hobo Nickels from the 1930s

Hobo Nickels are a form of sculptural art. The nickel was favored due to its size, thickness and softness. Even though the medium was popular amongst hobos due to its cheapness, it is a generic term as it was used by many different kinds of people.

What did they carve them with? That kind of sounds fun…

Except for the fact that I’m pretty sure it’s illegal to deface money

They carved them with rebellion

realmonstrosities:

Gnathostomulida is an entire phylum of microscopic worms that live buried beneath the seabed.

They have no circulatory or respiratory systems, but they do have a fearsome set of jaws for scraping bacteria, fungi and protists from grains of sand.

There are lots of worms that would be terrifying if they were a few metres bigger. Some of them would just cut you in half, but it looks like this one would scrape the flesh from your bones.

That’s why biodiversity is important.

Images: Martin V. Sørensen

(via mothersworry)

greggorysshocktheater:

Space Ghost by Alex Toth

(via mothersworry)