quotethatshow:

The sun looks like a solid object, but it’s not. It’s so hot that all its atoms are always in their gaseous state. Why is the sun so hot? Because its own stupendous gravity is squeezing its atoms together. The energy of gravity is being transformed into the energy of moving atoms. That’s what heat is. 

 [x]

(via mothersworry)


Nosferatu (1922)

Nosferatu (1922)

(via mothersworry)

historicaltimes:

Famine-Victims: 1876-1878, South India-over 5 million deaths

historicaltimes:

Famine-Victims: 1876-1878, South India-over 5 million deaths

Mathematics is the only good metaphysics.

Lord Kelvin

(via scienceisbeauty)
dovaking27:


Michael Jackson tells Bubbles the chimp in sign language to sit the fuck down and stop stealing sips of his tea. 

That’s the most gangsta thing I’ve ever seen.

dovaking27:

Michael Jackson tells Bubbles the chimp in sign language to sit the fuck down and stop stealing sips of his tea. 

That’s the most gangsta thing I’ve ever seen.

(via laugh-addict)

oldshowbiz:

Harold Lloyd’s first talkie, now in production

oldshowbiz:

Harold Lloyd’s first talkie, now in production

(via greatgrottu)

thesoundofonebrainthinking:

Good Times ….

thecivilwarparlor:

The two group portraits, taken at the Carlisle Indian Industrial School, show Chiricahua Apache boys and girls at the time of their arrival in November 1886, and four months after arriving, in March 1887.

Back row (L to R): Hugh Chee, Frederick Eskelsejah (Fred’ k Eskelsijah), Clement Seanilzay, Samson Noran, Ernest Hogee. Middle row: Margaret Y. Nadasthilah. Front row (L to R): Humphrey Escharzay, Beatrice Kiahtel, Janette Pahgostatum, Bishop Eatennah, Basil Ekarden.

John N. Choate was commissioned by the school to make portraits of the students as a public relations effort showing the success of the school in assimilating the Indians. Attended by over 12,000 Native American children from more than 140 tribes between 1879 and 1918, Carlisle was the model for nearly 150 Indian schools. Upon arrival, school officials cut the children’s hair and exchanged their clothing for uniforms. Students were given Christian names, and were punished for speaking their native languages. Note the changes in dress, hair, and skin color. This group belonged to the Chiricahua Apache tribe, whose leader, the famous Geronimo, had surrendered with his followers in September 1886, marking the end of the Apache wars. The band, including 103 children, was taken prisoner and sent to Florida; many of the children were then taken to Carlisle School.

The photographer arranged the students in the same order in the later portrait. Scholars note that the “after” portraits followed established conventions of middle-class portraiture of the period, emphasizing the civilizing mission of the school. School founder Richard Platt described this goal in an 1892 speech “all the Indian there is in the race should be dead. Kill the Indian in him, and save the man.”

Source: November 1886 photograph, National Museum of the American Indian, Washington D.C

"For 500 generations they flourished until newcomers came… much was lost; much was devalued, but much was also hidden away in the hearts of the dispossessed…

…Their voices insist upon a hearing and the cumulative wisdom of their long residence in this land offers rich insights to those willing to listen. The challenge now is to find a way to make knowledge of the ancient traditions, the experience of change and the living reality accessible and available…”

~ excerpt from Native Americans of the Pacific Northwest: An Introduction by David M. Buerge

http://chnm.gmu.edu/cyh/primary-sources/290

paintedcowboy:

cauldronandcross:

A Skeleton with a Gun in the Sand by Paul Chesley 

me.

paintedcowboy:

cauldronandcross:

A Skeleton with a Gun in the Sand by Paul Chesley 

me.

(via greatgrottu)

devilduck:

Chimpanzee riding a rocket, 1963, photo by Jack Gould, United States, courtesy of the Harvard Library.

devilduck:

Chimpanzee riding a rocket, 1963, photo by Jack Gould, United States, courtesy of the Harvard Library.

(via greatgrottu)

thecivilwarparlor:

A Group Of Warm Spring Apache Scouts
Recruitment of Indian scouts was first authorized on 28 July 1866 by an act of Congress
"The President is authorized to enlist and employ in the Territories and Indian country a force of Indians not to exceed one thousand to act as scouts, who shall receive the pay and allowances of cavalry soldiers, and be discharged whenever the necessity for further employment is abated, at the discretion of the department commander.”
In the Indian wars following the U.S. Civil War, the Indian scouts were a fast-moving, aggressive, and knowledgeable asset to the U.S. army. They often proved to be immune to army notions of discipline and demeanor, but they proved expert in traversing the vast distances of the American West and providing intelligence—and often a shock force—to the soldiers who sought hostile Indians. Pawnee Scout leader Luther H. North commented, “Neither the Wild Tribes, nor the Government Indian Scouts ever adopted any of the white soldier’s tactics. They thought their own much better.” Another chief of scouts, Stanton G. Fisher, emphasized the importance of Indian Scouts by saying of the soldiers, “Uncle Sam’s boys are too slow for this business.”
There existed doubts as to whether Indian Scouts would remain faithful or whether they would betray the white soldiers and turn against them in conflict. The Cibicue Apaches were among the first regular Army Scouts.They are also the only recorded 19th-century incident in which Indian scouts turned against the U.S. Army at Cibicue Creek in Arizona Territory. These Apache scouts were asked to campaign against their own kin, resulting in a mutiny against the army soldiers. Three of the scouts were court-martialed and executed.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Army_Indian_Scouts

thecivilwarparlor:

A Group Of Warm Spring Apache Scouts

Recruitment of Indian scouts was first authorized on 28 July 1866 by an act of Congress

"The President is authorized to enlist and employ in the Territories and Indian country a force of Indians not to exceed one thousand to act as scouts, who shall receive the pay and allowances of cavalry soldiers, and be discharged whenever the necessity for further employment is abated, at the discretion of the department commander.”

In the Indian wars following the U.S. Civil War, the Indian scouts were a fast-moving, aggressive, and knowledgeable asset to the U.S. army. They often proved to be immune to army notions of discipline and demeanor, but they proved expert in traversing the vast distances of the American West and providing intelligence—and often a shock force—to the soldiers who sought hostile Indians. Pawnee Scout leader Luther H. North commented, “Neither the Wild Tribes, nor the Government Indian Scouts ever adopted any of the white soldier’s tactics. They thought their own much better.” Another chief of scouts, Stanton G. Fisher, emphasized the importance of Indian Scouts by saying of the soldiers, “Uncle Sam’s boys are too slow for this business.”

There existed doubts as to whether Indian Scouts would remain faithful or whether they would betray the white soldiers and turn against them in conflict. The Cibicue Apaches were among the first regular Army Scouts.They are also the only recorded 19th-century incident in which Indian scouts turned against the U.S. Army at Cibicue Creek in Arizona Territory. These Apache scouts were asked to campaign against their own kin, resulting in a mutiny against the army soldiers. Three of the scouts were court-martialed and executed.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Army_Indian_Scouts

doooweeeooooh:

coolstoryfuckface:

Elsa Pageler

  Amateur Make-Up Artist Turns Herself Into Your Favorite Pop Culture Characters 

Read More at http://boredombash.com/elsa-rhae-face-paintings/ © BoredomBash

amateur my ass

(via itsnotanosering)